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THE MOST DANGEROUS GAME PDF

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The Most Dangerous Game. By Richard Connell. "OFF THERE to the right-- somewhere--is a large island," said Whitney." It's rather a mystery--". "What island is it. The Most Dangerous Game by Richard Connell This book is available for free download in a number of formats - including epub, pdf, azw, mobi and more. The Most Dangerous Game. by Richard Connell () "OFF THERE to the right--somewhere--is a large island," said Whitney." It's rather a mystery--".


The Most Dangerous Game Pdf

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Full Text Most Dangerous Game with Side Bar wildlifeprotection.info Download Full Text Most Dangerous Game with Side Bar wildlifeprotection.info ( MB). Locale: en. Who cares about how the animals feel? Rainsford laughed. The Most Dangerous Game abridged. By Richard Connell. “This weather is terrible,” Rainsford said. Option #1: ESSAY. Choose ONE of the following topics and write a 5 paragraph essay. 1. You are free-lance writer for the hunting magazine Outdoor Life.

May I pour Reading Check you another glass of port, Mr. The general filled both glasses, and said: Some He makes kings, some beggars. Me He made a hunter.

My hand was made for the Reading Skill trigger, my father said. He was a very rich man with a quarter of a million acres in the Crimea,6 and he was Read the bracketed passage. When I was only five years old he What can you infer about Zaroff gave me a little gun, specially made in Moscow for me, from the information in the to shoot sparrows with.

When I shot some of his prize passage? I killed my first bear in the Caucasus7 when I was ten. My whole life has been one prolonged hunt. I have hunted every kind of game in every land. It would be impossible for me to tell you how many animals I have killed. The Most Dangerous Game 99 I, luckily, had invested heavily in American securities, so I shall never have to open a tea room in Monte Carlo or drive a taxi in Paris. Naturally, I continued to hunt—grizzlies in your Rockies, crocodiles in the Ganges, rhinoceroses in East Africa.

Have you ever become bored As soon as I recovered I started for the Amazon to huntwith something that you were jaguars, for I had heard they were unusually cunning. Theygood at doing? I was bitterly disappointed.

I was lying in my tent with a splitting headache one night when a terrible thought pushed its way into my mind. Hunting was beginning to bore me! And hunting, remember, had been my life.

I have heard that in America business men often go to pieces when they give up the business that has been their life.

The general smiled.

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Now, mine is an analytical mind, Mr. Doubtless that is why I enjoy theLiterary Analysis problems of the chase. Rainsford, and have not hunted as much, but you perhaps can guess the answer. I always got my quarry. There is no greater bore than perfection. That is no boast; it is a mathematical certainty. The animal had nothing but his legs and his instinct.

Instinct is no match for reason. When I thought of this it was a tragic momentReading Check for me, I can tell you. I needed a new animal. I found one. So I bought this island, built this house, and here I do my hunting. No other hunting compares the animal is? If you have not with it for an instant. Every day I hunt, and I never grow guessed, pay close attention as bored now, for I have a quarry with which I can match you read the rest of this page.

I am speaking of hunting. General Zaroff, what you speak of is murder. He regarded Rainsford quizzically. Circle the three traits Zaroff you are! Ah, well, doubtless you had Puritan ancestors. The Most Dangerous Game The weak of the world were put here to give the strong pleasure.

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I am strong. Why should I not use my gift? If I wish to hunt, why should I not? I hunt the scum of the earth—sailors from tramp ships—lascars,10 blacks, Chinese, whites, mongrels—a thoroughbred horse or hound is worth more than a score of them. Reading Skill It gives me pleasure. They can reason, after a fashion.

So they are dangerous. Come to the window with me.

Out there! The general chuckled. They canReading Check crush a ship as easily as I crush this nut. We try to be civilized here.

And you shoot down men? Indian and East Indian sailors, employed on European ships. I assure you I do not do the thing you suggest. That would be barbarous. I treat these visitors with every consideration. They get plenty of good food and exercise. They get into splendid physical condition. You shall see for yourself tomorrow. I have about a dozen pupils down there now.

A very inferior lot, I regret to say. Poor specimens and more accustomed to the deck than to the jungle. Rainsford, with an effort, held his tongue in check. I give him a supply of food and an excellent hunting knife. I am to follow, armed only with a pistol Literary Analysis of the smallest caliber and range.

If he does not wish to hunt, I turn him over to Ivan. Ivan once had the honor of serving as official knouter11 to the Great White Czar, and he has his own ideas of sport. Invariably, Mr. Rainsford, invariably they choose the hunt. Then he added, hastily: Many of them afford only the most Reading Check elementary sort of problem. Occasionally I strike a tartar.

I eventually had to use the dogs. TAKE NOTES grotesque patterns on the courtyard below, and Rainsford could see moving about there a dozen or so huge black shapes; as they turned toward him, their eyes glittered greenly. Explain how you song from the Folies Berg ere. Will you come with me to the library? Rainsford; I hope youin the story? He lay, eyes wide open.

Once he thought he heard stealthy steps in the corridor outside his room. He sought to throw open the door; it would not open. He went to the window and looked out.

His room was high up in one of the towers. Is it internal, in the pattern of shadow, were black, noiseless forms;external, or both?

Rainsford went back to the bed and lay down. By many methods he tried to put himself to sleep. He had achieved a doze when, just as morning began to come, he heard, far off in the jungle, the faint report of a pistol. General Zaroff did not appear until luncheon. I am worried, Mr. Last night I detected traces of Literary Analysis my old complaint. How general explained: He made a straight trail that about leaving make his internal offered no problems at all.

They do excessively stupid and obvious things. Will you have another glass of Chablis, Mr. General plans to hunt him. This is really an inspiration. I drink to a foeman worthy of my steel—at last. Your woodcraft against mine. Your strength and stamina against mine.

Outdoor chess! And the stake is not without value, eh? Of courseWhat can you infer happened to you, in turn, must agree to say nothing of your visit here. Then a businesslike air animated him. I suggest you wear moccasins; they leave a poorer trail. I suggest too that you avoid the big swamp in theRainsford advice even though southeast corner of the island. We call it Death Swamp.

One foolish fellow tried it. Thekill him? You can imagine my feelings, Mr.

I loved Lazarus; he was the finest hound in my pack. Well, I must beg you to excuse me now. I always take a siesta after lunch. I shall not follow till dusk. Au revoir,14 Mr. Rainsford, au revoir.

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Under one arm hewhat inference do you make? Rainsford had fought his way through the bush for two hours. He had not been entirely clear-headed when theReading Check chateau gates snapped shut behind him. Zaroff says he will announce his His whole idea at first was to put distance betweendefeat if Rainsford can last a himself and General Zaroff, and, to this end, he hadcertain number of days. Now he had got a grip onthe number of days. He was in a picture with a frame of water, and his operations, clearly, must take place within that frame.

He executed a series of intricate loops; he doubled on his trail again and again, Rainsford experience in the recalling all the lore of the fox hunt, and all the dodges bracketed passage? Night found him leg-weary, with his hands and face lashed by the branches, on a thickly wooded ridge.

He knew it would be insane to blunder on through the dark, even if he had the strength. His need for rest was imperative and he thought: What broad limbs, after a fashion, rested. Rest brought him new confidence and almost a feeling of security. Even so can you infer about Rainsford zealous a hunter as General Zaroff could not trace him from his assumption?

But, perhaps, the general was a devil— An apprehensive night crawled slowly by like a wounded snake, and sleep did not visit Rainsford, although the silence of a dead world was on the jungle. Something was coming through the bush, unable to fall asleep? He flattened himself down on the limb, and through a screen of leaves almost as thick as tapestry, he watched.

The thing that was approaching was a man. It was General Zaroff. He made his way along with his eyes fixed in utmost concentration on the ground before him.

He paused, almost beneath the tree, dropped to Reading Check his knees and studied the ground. Reading Skill Rainsford held his breath. Which details suggest that Zaroff Rainsford froze there, every muscle tensed for a spring. But the sharp eyes of the hunter stopped before theyCircle the details in the reached the limb where Rainsford lay; a smile spreadbracketed passage that tell you.

Very deliberately he blew a smoke ring into the air; then he turned his back on the tree and walked carelessly away, back along the trail he had come. Histhe tree? The general could follow a trail through the woods at night; he could follow an extremely difficult trail; he must have uncanny powers; only by the merest chance had the Cossack failed to see his quarry.

It sent a shudder of cold horror through his whole being.

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Why had the general smiled? If he does not wish to hunt, I turn him over to Ivan. Ivan once had the honor of serving as official knouter to the Great White Czar, and he has his own ideas of sport. Invariably, Mr. Rainsford, invariably they choose the hunt. Then he added, hastily: Many of them afford only the most elementary sort of problem. Occasionally I strike a tartar. One almost did win. I eventually had to use the dogs. I'll show you. The lights from the windows sent a flickering illumination that made grotesque patterns on the courtyard below, and Rainsford could see moving about there a dozen or so huge black shapes; as they turned toward him, their eyes glittered greenly.

If anyone should try to get into my house--or out of it--something extremely regrettable would occur to him. Will you come with me to the library? I'm really not feeling well. You need a good, restful night's sleep. Tomorrow you'll feel like a new man, I'll wager. Then we'll hunt, eh? I've one rather promising prospect--" Rainsford was hurrying from the room.

He looks resourceful--Well, good night, Mr. Rainsford; I hope you have a good night's rest. He lay, eyes wide open. Once he thought he heard stealthy steps in the corridor outside his room. He sought to throw open the door; it would not open. He went to the window and looked out. His room was high up in one of the towers. The lights of the chateau were out now, and it was dark and silent; but there was a fragment of sallow moon, and by its wan light he could see, dimly, the courtyard.

There, weaving in and out in the pattern of shadow, were black, noiseless forms; the hounds heard him at the window and looked up, expectantly, with their green eyes.

Rainsford went back to the bed and lay down. By many methods he tried to put himself to sleep. He had achieved a doze when, just as morning began to come, he heard, far off in the jungle, the faint report of a pistol.

General Zaroff did not appear until luncheon. He was dressed faultlessly in the tweeds of a country squire. He was solicitous about the state of Rainsford's health.

I am worried, Mr. Last night I detected traces of my old complaint. The fellow lost his head. He made a straight trail that offered no problems at all.

That's the trouble with these sailors; they have dull brains to begin with, and they do not know how to get about in the woods. They do excessively stupid and obvious things. It's most annoying. Will you have another glass of Chablis, Mr. You've had no hunting--" "I wish to go today," said Rainsford. He saw the dead black eyes of the general on him, studying him.

General Zaroff's face suddenly brightened. He filled Rainsford's glass with venerable Chablis from a dusty bottle. But may I not venture to suggest that you will find my idea of sport more diverting than Ivan's? This is really an inspiration. I drink to a foeman worthy of my steel - at last. Your woodcraft against mine. Your strength and stamina against mine.

Outdoor chess! And the stake is not without value, eh? Of course you, in turn, must agree to say nothing of your visit here. But why discuss that now? Three days hence we can discuss it over a bottle of Veuve Cliquot, unless Then a businesslike air animated him. I suggest you wear moccasins; they leave a poorer trail. I suggest, too, that you avoid the big swamp in the southeast corner of the island.

We call it Death Swamp. There's quicksand there. One foolish fellow tried it. The deplorable part of it was that Lazarus followed him. You can imagine my feelings, Mr. I loved Lazarus; he was the finest hound in my pack. Well, I must beg you to excuse me now.

I always' take a siesta after lunch. You'll hardly have time for a nap, I fear. You'll want to start, no doubt. I shall not follow till dusk. Hunting at night is so much more exciting than by day, don't you think?

Au revoir, Mr. Rainsford, au revoir. From another door came Ivan. Under one arm he carried khaki hunting clothes, a haversack of food, a leather sheath containing a long-bladed hunting knife; his right hand rested on a cocked revolver thrust in the crimson sash about his waist.

The Most Dangerous Game

Rainsford had fought his way through the bush for two hours. I must keep my nerve," he said through tight teeth. He had not been entirely clearheaded when the chateau gates snapped shut behind him. His whole idea at first was to put distance between himself and General Zaroff; and, to this end, he had plunged along, spurred on by the sharp rowers of something very like panic. Now he had got a grip on himself, had stopped, and was taking stock of himself and the situation.

He saw that straight flight was futile; inevitably it would bring him face to face with the sea. He was in a picture with a frame of water, and his operations, clearly, must take place within that frame.

He executed a series of intricate loops; he doubled on his trail again and again, recalling all the lore of the fox hunt, and all the dodges of the fox. Night found him leg-weary, with hands and face lashed by the branches, on a thickly wooded ridge.

He knew it would be insane to blunder on through the dark, even if he had the strength. His need for rest was imperative and he thought, "I have played the fox, now I must play the cat of the fable. Rest brought him new confidence and almost a feeling of security.

Even so zealous a hunter as General Zaroff could not trace him there, he told himself; only the devil himself could follow that complicated trail through the jungle after dark. But perhaps the general was a devil-- An apprehensive night crawled slowly by like a wounded snake and sleep did not visit Rainsford, although the silence of a dead world was on the jungle. Toward morning when a dingy gray was varnishing the sky, the cry of some startled bird focused Rainsford's attention in that direction.

Something was coming through the bush, coming slowly, carefully, coming by the same winding way Rainsford had come. He flattened himself down on the limb and, through a screen of leaves almost as thick as tapestry, he watched.

That which was approaching was a man. It was General Zaroff. He made his way along with his eyes fixed in utmost concentration on the ground before him. He paused, almost beneath the tree, dropped to his knees and studied the ground. Rainsford's impulse was to hurl himself down like a panther, but he saw that the general's right hand held something metallic--a small automatic pistol. The hunter shook his head several times, as if he were puzzled. Then he straightened up and took from his case one of his black cigarettes; its pungent incenselike smoke floated up to Rainsford's nostrils.

Rainsford held his breath. The general's eyes had left the ground and were traveling inch by inch up the tree. Rainsford froze there, every muscle tensed for a spring.

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But the sharp eyes of the hunter stopped before they reached the limb where Rainsford lay; a smile spread over his brown face. Very deliberately he blew a smoke ring into the air; then he turned his back on the tree and walked carelessly away, back along the trail he had come.

The swish of the underbrush against his hunting boots grew fainter and fainter. The pent-up air burst hotly from Rainsford's lungs. His first thought made him feel sick and numb. The general could follow a trail through the woods at night; he could follow an extremely difficult trail; he must have uncanny powers; only by the merest chance had the Cossack failed to see his quarry.

Rainsford's second thought was even more terrible. It sent a shudder of cold horror through his whole being. Why had the general smiled? Why had he turned back? Rainsford did not want to believe what his reason told him was true, but the truth was as evident as the sun that had by now pushed through the morning mists.

The general was playing with him! The general was saving him for another day's sport! The Cossack was the cat; he was the mouse. Then it was that Rainsford knew the full meaning of terror. I will not. His face was set and he forced the machinery of his mind to function. Three hundred yards from his hiding place he stopped where a huge dead tree leaned precariously on a smaller, living one. Throwing off his sack of food, Rainsford took his knife from its sheath and began to work with all his energy.

The job was finished at last, and he threw himself down behind a fallen log a hundred feet away. He did not have to wait long. The cat was coming again to play with the mouse. Following the trail with the sureness of a bloodhound came General Zaroff.

Nothing escaped those searching black eyes, no crushed blade of grass, no bent twig, no mark, no matter how faint, in the moss. So intent was the Cossack on his stalking that he was upon the thing Rainsford had made before he saw it. His foot touched the protruding bough that was the trigger. Even as he touched it, the general sensed his danger and leaped back with the agility of an ape.

But he was not quite quick enough; the dead tree, delicately adjusted to rest on the cut living one, crashed down and struck the general a glancing blow on the shoulder as it fell; but for his alertness, he must have been smashed beneath it. He staggered, but he did not fall; nor did he drop his revolver. He stood there, rubbing his injured shoulder, and Rainsford, with fear again gripping his heart, heard the general's mocking laugh ring through the jungle.

Not many men know how to make a Malay mancatcher. Luckily for me I, too, have hunted in Malacca. You are proving interesting, Mr. I am going now to have my wound dressed; it's only a slight one. But I shall be back. I shall be back. It was flight now, a desperate, hopeless flight, that carried him on for some hours.

Dusk came, then darkness, and still he pressed on. The ground grew softer under his moccasins; the vegetation grew ranker, denser; insects bit him savagely.

Then, as he stepped forward, his foot sank into the ooze. He tried to wrench it back, but the muck sucked viciously at his foot as if it were a giant leech. With a violent effort, he tore his feet loose. He knew where he was now. Death Swamp and its quicksand. His hands were tight closed as if his nerve were something tangible that someone in the darkness was trying to tear from his grip.

The softness of the earth had given him an idea. He stepped back from the quicksand a dozen feet or so and, like some huge prehistoric beaver, he began to dig. Rainsford had dug himself in in France when a second's delay meant death.

That had been a placid pastime compared to his digging now. The pit grew deeper; when it was above his shoulders, he climbed out and from some hard saplings cut stakes and sharpened them to a fine point.

These stakes he planted in the bottom of the pit with the points sticking up. Download it! The colored dots and icons indicate which themes are associated with that appearance. Between comments about the island , Rainsford and Whitney who are both hunters argue about whether animals experience thoughts and feelings Zaroff demonstrates for Rainsford how he stocks the island with fresh human prey by tricking ships to sail into the cliffs with guiding lights Rainsford asks what happens if he wins, Zaroff assures him that he can leave the island , but on the condition that he never tells anyone about his experiences there.

Rainsford refuses He leaves to take a nap before pursuing Rainsford at dusk. Hunting is Cite This Page. MLA Chicago. McLendon, Kelsey. The Island. Retrieved April 14, Copy to Clipboard. Download this Chart PDF. They're like having in-class notes for every discussion!Again Rainsford lifted the heavy knocker, and let it fall. SlideShare Explore Search You. Your strength and stamina against mine. But perhaps the general was a devil-- An apprehensive night crawled slowly by like a wounded snake and sleep did not visit Rainsford, although the silence of a dead world was on the jungle.

Journal of American Studies, 35, pp Indian and East Indian sailors, employed on European ships. General Zaroff had an exceedingly good dinner in his great paneled dining hall that evening. Indeed, he finally defeats Zaroff only by breaking in to the mansion and hiding in his bedroom.

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